Stats & Apothecaries

“Whether we like it or not, artists have become products these days. Our creative vitality gets sold like a commercial good. So for my Apothecary series, I wanted to tease this idea and turn the things most intimate and ordinary to me into an artistic emblem. I started with sweat which is a pheromone and naturally attracts an audience. Then I started to look at myself differently and saw more to offer.” – Brent Ray Fraser

*PINK for BRF Apothecaries  |  *WHITE for BRF Stats

 

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PENIS (ERECT): 10″

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WEIGHT: 205lbs.

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BICEPS: 18″

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CHEST: 45″

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THIGHS: 25″

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HEIGHT: 6’2″

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SHOE: 12″

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ASS FUR: $200.00

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BRF “PISS”: $250.00

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ANAL FUR: $250.00

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BRF “CUM”: $199.99

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ARMPIT FUR: $99.99

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HAIR: BLONDE

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EYES: BLUE

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PENIS (FLACCID): 6.5″

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CHEST MAN FUR: $99.99

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EAU de BRF: $49.99

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PUBIC MAN FUR: $250.00

Details

Bodily Wares

For his Apothecary series, Brent Ray Fraser is having fun with our current cultural desire for authenticity and hand-crafted goods. His clear glass bottles with their cork tops and old-fashioned labels have a country store charm to them – a homespun quality. But what Fraser is artfully packaging is our contemporary desire for fetish, for all the illicit charms of this wildly pornographic age. We want to have it all so Fraser feeds our needs with his endless supply of body trimmings and other secretions – including some delightfully salacious self-portraits made entirely of ass fur.

Historical Significance

Artists literally selling their bodies often earn notoriety but also critical praise. In 1961, the Italian artist Piero Manzoni sold his own shit (in a piece called Merda D’Artista) in a series of 90 tins which he sold for $37 each – the equivalent price to their same weight in gold. One of those tins was recently auctioned at Sotheby’s for $150,000. The oddball British duo Gilbert and George have subsumed their bodies completely to art – they regard themselves as ‘living sculptures’ and publicly display themselves (occasionally naked) in unexpected settings as well as feature their bodily excrement as a focal point in their over-sized photographic compositions. In 1986, they won the Turner Prize, Britain’s most acclaimed visual arts award.

Channeling Concepts

Fraser’s Apothecary series elevate the ephemera of his daily existence to something intriguing and beautiful, a wanted good. The series also slyly references Damien Hirst’s Pharmacy installation artwork though instead of sensory-dulling drugs being displayed, Fraser is filling our current taste for every sexual peccadillo possible. These small vials prove the bigger point that all art is intimate. And they’re a wink wink nudge nudge conceptual comment on how our celebrity-obsessed culture turns artists into stars that everyone wants a piece of.